Will the doha round lead to preference erosion?
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Will the doha round lead to preference erosion?

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Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementMary Amiti, John Romalis.
SeriesNBER working paper series -- working paper 12971, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research : Online) -- working paper no. 12971.
ContributionsAmiti, Mary., Romalis, John., National Bureau of Economic Research.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHB1
The Physical Object
FormatElectronic resource
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16306947M
LC Control Number2007615125

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As reductions in most-favored-nation tariffs in industrial countries will inevitably lead to preference erosion, African countries need to ensure that the Doha Round leads to liberalization in all. Will the Doha Round Lead to Preference Erosion? Mary Amiti and John Romalis NBER Working Paper No. March JEL No. F13,F14,F17 ABSTRACT This paper assesses the effects of reducing tariffs under the Doha Round on market access for developing. Jun 29,  · This paper assesses the effects of reducing tariffs under the Doha Round on market access for developing countries. It shows that for many developing countries actual preferential access is less generous than it appears because of low product coverage or complex rules of origin. Thus, lowering tariffs under the multilateral system is likely to lead to a net increase in market access for many Cited by: Get this from a library! Will the Doha Round Lead to Preference Erosion?. [John Romalis; Mary Amiti] -- Annotation This paper assesses the effects of reducing tariffs under the Doha Round on market access for developing countries. It shows that for many developing countries, actual preferential.

Downloadable! This paper assesses the effects of reducing tariffs under the Doha Round on market access for developing countries. It shows that for many developing countries, actual preferential access is less generous than it appears because of low product coverage or complex rules of origin. Thus lowering tariffs under the multilateral system is likely to lead to a net increase in market. Get this from a library! Will the Doha Round lead to preference erosion?. [Mary Amiti; John Romalis; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- "This paper assesses the effects of reducing tariffs under the Doha Round on market access for developing countries. It shows that for many developing countries, actual preferential access is less. Downloadable (with restrictions)! This paper assesses the effects of reducing tariffs under the Doha Round on market access for developing countries. It shows that for many developing countries actual preferential access is less generous than it appears because of low product coverage or complex rules of origin. Thus, lowering tariffs under the multilateral system is likely to lead to a net. Nov 01,  · Read "Africa in the Doha Round: Dealing with Preference Erosion and Beyond" by Yongzheng Yang available from Rakuten Kobo. Improving market access in industrial countries and retaining preferences have been Africa's two key objectives in the D Brand: INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND.

The Doha Development Agenda and Preference Erosion: Modeling the Impacts Dominique van der Mensbrugghe The World Bank April 24, Introduction Trade preferences and the role of preference erosion may play an important role in the evolving Doha Development Agenda (DDA) round of multilateral trade negotiations. Clearly, agricultural interests in. The Doha Round is intended to advance the interests of developing countries but it has run into problems because additional liberalization in sectors of interest to some developing countries could. As reductions in most-favored-nation tariffs in industrial countries will inevitably lead to preference erosion, African countries need to ensure that the Doha Round leads to liberalization in all sectors by all World Trade Organization (WTO) members, so that the resulting gains will offset any losses. The Doha round of trade talks was an attempted multilateral trade agreement. It would have been between every member of the World Trade Organization. It was launched at the Doha, Qatar WTO meeting in November Its goal was to finish up by January , but the deadline was pushed back to The talks were finally suspended in June